Miley Cyrus is the new Barack Obama

Miley Cyrus is being lambasted for coarsening American culture. President Obama has been doing that for years. Photo: AP

OAKLAND, August 28, 2013 — Miley Cyrus is now the new Barack Obama.

Americans are aghast this week at the young woman formerly known as Hannah Montana, the daughter of the country music star who sang “Achy Breaky Heart.”


SEE RELATED: Miley Cyrus twerks the VMAs: Pass the eye-bleach


Billy Ray Cyrus’s offspring has absolutely nothing to do with the battle over radical Islam or America’s tax policies. Her relevance to anything that matters is zero, making her the perfect spokesperson for the age of Obama.

Hannah Montana’s doppleganger is being attacked for dancing salaciously with some singer, the son of an actor who once starred on “Growing Pains.” The offending act occurred at some awards ceremony put on by a music television station that does not actually play music. Other celebrities expressed disgust at the display while forgetting birds of a feather flock together. As for the screaming teenagers attending such concerts, there is a good chance that many of them were chanting “Yes, we can” back in 2008. Can what? Nobody knew. It made them feel cool so they chanted.

Miley is being criticized for allowing style to trump substance, yet the leader of the free world gets a free pass for mouthing platitudes and flashing a smile while the world burns.

So what if Miley taught young girls that the key to success in a hyper-sexualized society is to ratchet up the raunchy sex? Obama is teaching young blacks that empowerment comes from victimhood and a hyper-racialized society. Miley, through her style of dress, tried to glamorize behavior that used to be considered “slutty” and demeaning. Obama claimed that if he had a son, the kid would look like Trayvon Martin, who through his style of dress tried to buy into thuggish behavior that kids find glamorous.

Neither Miley or Obama caused the decline in American culture, but they both seem comfortable in accelerating it. Rather than be role models, they seem more comfortable reveling in their celebrity status. For Miley, it is the bizarre attempt to spread eroticism while wearing the ultra-wholesome Teddy Ruxpin t-shirt. For Obama, it is associating with everybody from gangster rappers Jay-Z and the “Pimp with the limp” rather than spread a positive message. Being “cool” takes precedence over using a powerful microphone to better the world.

Miley is the stereotypical Millennial; every picture is a “selfie” and status updates are routine for people who have no status. Obama is the precursor to the Millennials, the man who said “We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.” America is becoming the nation of narcissists with Obama as our leader and Miley as the x-rated after-dinner entertainment. Like Miley, Obama has paid staff to make sure that his most mundane non-events are captured for eternity. Miley’s Teddy Ruxpin pose is no less embarrassing than Obama’s golf pose with one leg in the air.

They are both famous for being famous. They are now known not for doing anything, but for merely being. Miley performed at a music video awards show yet did not offer anything truly worthy of an award. Obama was given a Nobel Peace Prize before ever setting foot in the White House. They were both told they were special just for being them, and they believed it.

The tragedy is that neither Miley or Obama has somebody who can keep them in check. Nobody reins them in and tells them that maybe they are not as awesome as they think they are. Being surrounded by sycophants makes it difficult for people to learn and grow properly.

Miley and Obama both need to grow up. Real leadership means leading by example. It means balancing fun with responsibility. Life cannot be a permanent vacation.

Obama and Miley need to both get out of their bubbles and see that their behavior does affect others. She should stop “twerking,” and he should stop shirking. Perhaps Miley could learn from Aretha Franklin, who taught women to respect themselves. Obama could sit down with Dr. Benjamin Carson and Dr. Thomas Sowell, who teach blacks that pride comes with achievement, not appearances.

As America marks 50 years since Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous “I have a dream speech,” we can only hope that content of character will matter again. As for Miley and Obama, they know they are capable of doing better.

So are the rest of us, who should tune them out until they get their respective acts together.

 

Brooklyn born, Long Island raised, and now living in Los Angeles, Eric Golub is a politically conservative columnist, author, public speaker, satirist and comedian. Eric is the author of the book trilogy “Ideological Bigotry, “Ideological Violence,” and “Ideological Idiocy.” 

Follow Eric @TYGRRRREXPRESS

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Eric Golub

Eric Golub is a politically conservative Jewish blogger, author, public speaker, and comedian. His book trilogy is “Ideological Bigotry,” “Ideological Violence,” and  “Ideological Idiocy.” 

He is Brooklyn born, Long Island raised, and has lived in Los Angeles since 1990. He received his Bachelors degree from the University of Judaism, and his MBA from USC. A stockbrokerage professional since 1994, he began blogging on March 11th, 2007, the three year anniversary of the Madrid bombings and the midpoint of 9/11. He has been inflicting his world view on his unfortunate readers since then. He blogs about politics Monday through Friday, and about football and other human interest items on weekends.

 

 

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