Glenn Beck gives keynote address at the NRA's "Stand and Fight" rally

Beck slams Progressive elites and demonstrates that the problem is Photo: AP

HOUSTON- May 5, 2013 – Glenn Beck gave a rousing, emotional and direct keynote address over a period of just under two hours at the NRA’s “Stand and Fight” rally in Houston on Saturday, May 4, 2013 highlighting the theme that individuals, not guns, are responsible for good or evil.

In front of thousands and a sold out crowd at the George R. Brown Convention Center in downtown Houston, Beck drew a “line in the sand” in the fight against Progressive Elites in both political parties and their attempts to “fundamentally transform” America.

Beck’s speech centered on the theme that is the man, not the gun, responsible for evil like Sandy Hook, and that guns are overwhelmingly used for good, because people are inherently good. 

According to Beck, the real difference between freedom loving defenders of the Constitution and Progressive Elites is that Progressives feel that they can make better choices for us then we can make for ourselves, and because of that, they will regulate us until we comply.

To a standing ovation he followed this with “I will not comply.”

Beck also highlighted the fact that personal responsibility and duty accompanies rights. He noted the gun debate is not a fight about guns, but about government control versus the right of American’s to make choices and to face the consequences of those choices, be they good or bad.

He also recognized that gun owners and Constitutional advocates have “a tough road ahead,” and that “this weekend is one of the most important moments in American history and the defining moment for the NRA.”

Beck used guns borrowed from the NRA museum to make the point that guns can be used for good or evil, depending on the person behind them.

He presented a firearm owned by Charles Manson that was taken away by police before Manson ordered the slaughter of nine innocent victims. Those victims were all killed with knives, not guns, and Manson and his followers were directly responsible for the carnage.

Beck also showed a handgun that belonged to one of NYPD’s first responders to the World Trade Center on 9/11, calling it a “small token of liberty,” and a reflection of the uniquely good American spirit.

Finally, he showed a gun used by an American the “first time we fought against Muslim extremists,” the Barbary pirates. That same weapon was later taken from the dead body of an American soldier and used against American troops by those same “Muslim extremists.”

He hammered home the point he was making with this gun by saying, “So, what is this gun, good or evil? It is nothing! A gun is only the reflection of the people that use it.”

Beck also countered the Progressives, and the complicit mainstream media’s attacks on law abiding gun owners by using anecdotes of people who used guns to stop violent crime.

He slammed the mainstream media for not reporting any of these positive gun stories or facts that do not support infringing on Americans Second Amendment rights, and said that the truth does not fit the Progressive agenda but fortunately “the truth has no agenda.”

Some of the facts that most of the media intentionally conceals from the public eye included the following: one decade after England banned guns their gun murder rate doubled, and that 65% of the 30,000 gun deaths each year in America are suicides.

Beck then made an argument that the Framers were right, and that there are instances from American history that explain why Americans might need weapons to protect us from government tyranny. He specifically invoked the American Indians and their atrocious slaughter by the American government and the “southern Democrats” taking away or severely limiting the Second Amendment rights of African-Americans in the 1850s and 1880s, when they were fully aware of the threat the Klu Klux Klan posed at that time.

Beck segued into why it might be necessary to have a weapon that shoots more than six bullets. He said, “If the Klan or the Crips, or any of the gangs coming across the border unimpeded come knocking at my door, I may need more than six bullets, thank you.”

To conclude, Beck returned to the theme of the speech, “it is not the gun, or the knife… but the cold heart, filled with error, darkness and coldness. That is the problem.”

“We will work together as Americans to preserve our rights, the right of our children to be safe, our wives and daughters to not be held at knife or gunpoint by a rapist, and our most precious and vulnerable little ones to have the right to survive a simple walk down a city street.”

Beck finished his speech to a very long standing ovation using a poignant quotation from Winston Churchill, “we will fight by strapping on the full armor of God. We will stand firm with the belt of truth, the breastplate of righteousness, the shield of faith, the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the spirit. We will fight their tactics of fear, we will fight their darkness. We will fight their lies and we will counter them with love, peace and equal justice for all mankind.”

 


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James Richard Edwards

James R. Edwards is a medical malpractice defense attorney in Houston, Tx. He obtained a Bachelor’s degree from LSU (Geaux Tigers!) in Psychology and subsequently went on to attend the University of Houston Law Center. James became interested in politics in law school because of the consistent and oppressive disgust and revulsion shown by the staff and Professors for the Constitution and for America in general. He is a tireless advocate for federalism and minimizing the impact the federal government has on all of our lives. 

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