All American wine pairings for Thanksgiving

The perfect pairings for your Thanksgiving feast are found right here in the USA. Find out what our wine editor Laurie Forster recommends with your turkey and all the fabulous sides. Photo: The Wine Coach

EASTON, Md., November 16, 2012 — Thanksgiving is a very American tradition where we celebrate by indulging in comfort food and libations surrounded by family and friends. This year instead of choosing wines from across the pond make it an “All American Thanksgiving” by choosing wines produced here in the USA.

Every state in the US produces wine and choices are not limited to California or West coast states. There are some great pairings choices for Thanksgiving from unexpected places which makes serving them to your guests even more fun. Wait till Aunt Sally finds out her favorite white wine is from Michigan and Dad falls in love with an Idaho red!

No matter what you choose to drink on Thanksgiving it is important to find a wine that has a good balance of fruit and acidity. This will help it stand up to all the salt and spices in our favorite stuffing, potatoes or casseroles. Turkey is pretty neutral and can go with a variety of wines but it is a lean meat so steer away from reds that are overly tannic.

It’s a good idea to have both a white and red on hand for your Thanksgiving feast since some guests may have a preference for one or the other.  White can also serve as the starter wine for appetizers and to begin the meal before switching to a red as things wind down.

Here are some great choices for All American pairings:

Chateau Grand Traverse Whole Cluster Riesling 2011, Old Mission Peninsula, Michigan, $18

Riesling is always a food friendly option for Thanksgiving but in place of a German Riesling look to Michigan for a great white.

An off-dry style, this wine has a touch of sweetness that will tame the spicier dishes on the table.  

Aromas of crisp apples, nectarine and citrus follow through on the palate which finishes crisp.

Recognized by Food & Wine Magazine in January as one of the top US wines this Riesling will be a hit for the holiday and beyond.

Arizona Stronghold Tazi White Blend 2011, Cochise County, Arizona, $23

Aromatic whites can be a great option for turkey day but instead of Gewurztraminer try an aromatic white blend from Arizona!

A blend of Malvasia, Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Pinot Gris and Chardonnay this white has a rainbow of fruit flavors from tropical to citrus.

Be warned that just one sip and this wine will have a stronghold on you! 

McPherson Tre Colore Red 2010, Texas, $18

Instead of a Pinot Noir or a Beaujolais for Thanksgiving try this red blend from McPherson Cellars in Lubbock, Texas.

Tre Colore is a blend of 3 grapes originally from the Rhone Valley in France—Mourvedre, Carignan and Viognier.

The first two are red grapes adding mouthwatering berry flavors that are accented by a hint of smoke on the finish.

There is a touch of the white grape Viognier in the blend that adds some floral and exotic fruit to the blend.

Full in fruit flavors and easy to sip; this red will not last long on your holiday table.

SawTooth Syrah 2011, Snake River Valley, Idaho, $18

Instead of an Australian Shiraz try this Syrah from Sawtooth. The lighter body of this Syrah versus its Aussie counterparts ensures that the wine will not overwhelm your turkey.

Located in the Snake River Valley, Sawtooth Winery is named after the jagged mountain range that is part of the Idaho landscape.

Riped fruits, Cherry and spice fill the nose of this medium body red that will be a delightful pairing to your Thanksgiving feast.

About Laurie:

Laurie Forster, The Wine Coach is an award-winning sommelier, author, TV personality and comedian. Her edgy approach to demystifying wine caught the eye of major networks and led her to guest appearances on FOX Morning News, Martha Stewart Living Today and ABC News at Noon.

Forster is also the host of her own radio show, The Sipping Point on WBAL 1090AM and has created an award-winning mobile application. “The Wine Coach” was listed as one of the Top 8 Wine Apps in Wine Enthusiast, Top 5 Wine Apps in the World by Departures International Magazine and 2012 App of the Year from Go Mobile Solutions.

You can reach her on twitter @thewinecoach or on Facebook.

Read more of Laurie’s work at The Sipping Point in the Communities at the Washington Times.


This article is the copyrighted property of the writer and Communities @ WashingtonTimes.com. Written permission must be obtained before reprint in online or print media. REPRINTING TWTC CONTENT WITHOUT PERMISSION AND/OR PAYMENT IS THEFT AND PUNISHABLE BY LAW.

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Laurie Forster

Laurie Forster, The Wine Coach® is a wine educator, dynamic speaker and author of the award-winning book The Sipping Point: A Crash Course in Wine. Laurie was not born with a silver corkscrew in her mouth. In fact, growing up Laurie thought wine was pink and came in a box. After several stressful business dinners trying to order off wine lists the size of a phone book, she began educating herself on wine. In 2001 she left the business world to professionally study wine and save others from these awkward moments. Laurie began her wine career in Manhattan where she studied with the American Sommelier Association to earn her certificate in Viticulture and Vinification. She has since earned an Advanced Certificate with the Wine & Spirits Education Trust (WSET), completed her first step towards certification with the Court of Master Sommeliers and has trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley. Laurie’s specialty is creating unique corporate keynotes, team building events and group tasting seminars where she can deliver on her mission to demystify wine one glass at a time. She is also a regular contributor to several magazines; a sought after guest expert on TV and radio stations across the country, including Martha Stewart Radio. For more visit: www.TheWineCoachSecrets.com

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