March Against Monsanto: GMO protests in 436 cities worldwide (images)

Previous
Next
  • Protesters march against Monsanto in Asheville, North Carolina, on Saturday, May 25, 2013. (Photo by Todd DeFeo) Protesters march against Monsanto in Asheville, North Carolina, on Saturday, May 25, 2013. (Photo by Todd DeFeo)
  • Protesters march against Monsanto in Asheville, North Carolina, on Saturday, May 25, 2013. (Photo by Todd DeFeo) Protesters march against Monsanto in Asheville, North Carolina, on Saturday, May 25, 2013. (Photo by Todd DeFeo)
  • Protesters march against Monsanto in Asheville, North Carolina, on Saturday, May 25, 2013. (Photo by Todd DeFeo) Protesters march against Monsanto in Asheville, North Carolina, on Saturday, May 25, 2013. (Photo by Todd DeFeo)
  • March Against Monsanto  Waikaki   / MAM Facebook March Against Monsanto Waikaki / MAM Facebook
  • March on Monsanto Salt Lake City  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Salt Lake City / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto New Zealand  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto New Zealand / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto  Nashville / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Nashville / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Philly   / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Philly / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Stockholm / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Stockholm / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto South Africa  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto South Africa / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Seattle  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Seattle / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto  San Francisco / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto San Francisco / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto San Diego  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto San Diego / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto New York City  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto New York City / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Melbourne   / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Melbourne / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Japan  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Japan / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Greenville, SC  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Greenville, SC / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Greece  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Greece / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Greece  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Greece / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Greece  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Greece / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto  Eureka CA / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Eureka CA / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto California   / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto California / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Bulgaria  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Bulgaria / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Austin, TX  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Austin, TX / MOM Facbook Page
  • March on Monsanto Australia  / MOM Facbook Page March on Monsanto Australia / MOM Facbook Page
  • People carry signs during a protest against Monsanto in Montpelier, Vt. on Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. Protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. Monsanto Co., based in St. Louis, said Saturday its seeds improve agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving resources such as water and energy. (AP Photo/Mark Collier) People carry signs during a protest against Monsanto in Montpelier, Vt. on Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. Protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. Monsanto Co., based in St. Louis, said Saturday its seeds improve agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving resources such as water and energy. (AP Photo/Mark Collier) Photo by: Mark Collier
  • People chant and carry signs during a protest against Monsanto in front of the capitol building in Montpelier, Vt. on Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. Protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. Monsanto Co., based in St. Louis, said Saturday its seeds improve agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving resources such as water and energy. (AP Photo/Mark Collier) People chant and carry signs during a protest against Monsanto in front of the capitol building in Montpelier, Vt. on Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. Protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. Monsanto Co., based in St. Louis, said Saturday its seeds improve agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving resources such as water and energy. (AP Photo/Mark Collier) Photo by: Mark Collier
  • FILE- In this Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, photo, Vernon Hugh Bowman, a 75-year-old Indiana soybean farmer, speaks with reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington. Supreme Court said Monday, May 13, 2013, that an Indiana farmer violated Monsanto Co.'s patents on soybean seeds resistant to its weed-killer. The farmer had been growing the beans without buying new seeds from the corporation.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) FILE- In this Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, photo, Vernon Hugh Bowman, a 75-year-old Indiana soybean farmer, speaks with reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington. Supreme Court said Monday, May 13, 2013, that an Indiana farmer violated Monsanto Co.'s patents on soybean seeds resistant to its weed-killer. The farmer had been growing the beans without buying new seeds from the corporation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) Photo by: J. Scott Applewhite
  • A protester wearing a protective suit and mask holds up a bottle of Monsanto's Roundup herbicide during a protest against Monsanto in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. "March Against Monsanto" protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. (AP Photo/Nelson Antoine) A protester wearing a protective suit and mask holds up a bottle of Monsanto's Roundup herbicide during a protest against Monsanto in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. "March Against Monsanto" protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. (AP Photo/Nelson Antoine) Photo by: Nelson Antoine
  • A protester wearing a protective suit and mask holds up a sign toward passing cars that reads in Portuguese "A better world according to Monsanto is a world with more cancer" in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. "March Against Monsanto" protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. (AP Photo/Nelson Antoine) A protester wearing a protective suit and mask holds up a sign toward passing cars that reads in Portuguese "A better world according to Monsanto is a world with more cancer" in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. "March Against Monsanto" protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. (AP Photo/Nelson Antoine) Photo by: Nelson Antoine
  • A man with a cat on his shoulder wears a mask covered by the words in Spanish "Transgenic, cancer/death" as he protests the use of genetically modified food near the offices of U.S.-based seed giant Monsanto, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Activists are taking part in a global protest "March Against Monsanto," demanding a stop to the use of agrochemicals and the production of genetically modified food, which according to them has harmful health effects, causing cancer, infertility and other diseases. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) A man with a cat on his shoulder wears a mask covered by the words in Spanish "Transgenic, cancer/death" as he protests the use of genetically modified food near the offices of U.S.-based seed giant Monsanto, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Activists are taking part in a global protest "March Against Monsanto," demanding a stop to the use of agrochemicals and the production of genetically modified food, which according to them has harmful health effects, causing cancer, infertility and other diseases. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) Photo by: Natacha Pisarenko
  • Demonstrators hold signs reading in Spanish "Glyphosate = illness, disability, death," left, "Genocide concealed by agrochemicals in Argentina," second from left, and "Get out Monsanto from Argentina" near the offices of the U.S.-based company Monsanto in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Activists are taking part in a global protest "March Against Monsanto" against the seed giant, demanding a stop to the use of agrochemicals and the production of genetically modified food. Protesters say genetically modified organisms can lead to serious health conditions and harm the environment. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) Demonstrators hold signs reading in Spanish "Glyphosate = illness, disability, death," left, "Genocide concealed by agrochemicals in Argentina," second from left, and "Get out Monsanto from Argentina" near the offices of the U.S.-based company Monsanto in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Activists are taking part in a global protest "March Against Monsanto" against the seed giant, demanding a stop to the use of agrochemicals and the production of genetically modified food. Protesters say genetically modified organisms can lead to serious health conditions and harm the environment. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) Photo by: Natacha Pisarenko
  • A masked demonstrator holds up a sign that reads in Spanish "Get Monsanto out of Latin America!" near the offices of the U.S.-based seed giant Monsanto in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Activists are taking part in a global protest "March Against Monsanto" against the seed giant, demanding a stop to the use of agrochemicals and the production of genetically modified food, which according to them has harmful health effects, causing cancer, infertility and other diseases. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) A masked demonstrator holds up a sign that reads in Spanish "Get Monsanto out of Latin America!" near the offices of the U.S.-based seed giant Monsanto in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Activists are taking part in a global protest "March Against Monsanto" against the seed giant, demanding a stop to the use of agrochemicals and the production of genetically modified food, which according to them has harmful health effects, causing cancer, infertility and other diseases. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) Photo by: Natacha Pisarenko

WASHINGTON, DC, May 25, 2013 – The Washington DC March Against Monsanto was just one of some 250 protests around the world, but it featured the unique attraction of marching between two key seats of power: the White House and Monsanto headquarters.

Protestors numbered in the several hundreds, if not thousands, armed with signs showing their anger over the actions of the biotech giant and the failure of Congress to approve legislation toward the labeling of genetically modified food.

“Give it a label if you’re going to bring it to the table,” went one of the chants.

If 60 other countries, and most industrialized countries, don’t let genetically modified food go without labels, why should the U.S., asked the speakers.

The international movement to March Against Monsanto gained momentum after last Thursday’s failed attempt by Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Oregon) to repeal the measure known as the Monsanto Protection Act. 

List of GMO product manufacturers / March on Monsanto

List of GMO product manufacturers / March on Monsanto

 

“March Against Monsanto” is a grass roots effort to broadcast the dangers posed by genetically modified food, identifying the food giants that are creating it.

Founder and organizer Tami Canal said protests were held in 436 cities in 52 countries. Reports are that more than two millions persons were out marching against Monsanto.

Genetically modified plants are grown from seeds that are engineered to resist insecticides and herbicides, add nutritional benefits or otherwise improve crop yields and increase the global food supply.

Most corn, soybean and cotton crops grown in the United States today have been genetically modified.

But some say genetically modified organisms can lead to serious health conditions and harm the environment. The use of GMOs has been a growing issue of contention in recent years; with health advocates pushing for mandatory labeling of genetically modified products even though the federal government and many scientists say the technology is safe.

In Washington, a placard featuring a smiling yellow ear of corn tucked into a fish’s body led the charge. On its hybrid body, high above the crowd, were the words “Label GMO Food.”

Some protestors wore red or dressed like bees, and many of the signs and comments by speakers addressed the problem of the dwindling bee population in the opening rally at the White House and the concluding rally at Monsanto headquarters.

Chemical agents, including Agent Orange in the 1960s and, more recently synthetic sweeteners, were targeted in comments and in posters.

On a sunny, breezy afternoon following a cold snap that shifted the nation’s capital from summer-like weather back to the feeling of early spring, the event brought together a diverse group.

Among the throngs were concerned parents and their children, anarchists, Veterans for Peace, farmers, healthcare providers, and a whole lot of people united in their passion against the actions of the company and for transparency.

They demanded labels for foods that have been modified and for a closing of the revolving door that allows people with ties to big agriculture to take positions of power that rewards it with privileges.

Monsanto Co., based in St. Louis, said Saturday that it respects people’s rights to express their opinion on the topic, but maintains that its seeds improve agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving resources such as water and energy.

The Food and Drug Administration does not require genetically modified foods to carry a label, but organic food companies and some consumer groups have intensified their push for labels, arguing that the modified seeds are floating from field to field and contaminating traditional crops.

A growing network of consumers who are wary of processed and modified foods has bolstered the groups.

The Senate this week overwhelmingly rejected a bill that would allow states to require labeling of genetically modified foods.

The Biotechnology Industry Organization, a lobbying group that represents Monsanto, DuPont & Co. and other makers of genetically modified seeds, has said that it supports voluntary labeling for people who seek out such products.

But it says that mandatory labeling would only mislead or confuse consumers into thinking the products aren’t safe; even though the FDA has said there’s no difference between GMO and organic, non-GMO foods.

Vermont and Connecticut state legislatures have moved forward with demands that food companies declare genetically modified ingredients on their packages.

Supermarket retailer Whole Foods Markets Inc. has said that all products in its North American stores that contain genetically modified ingredients will be labeled as such by 2018, continuing that non-GMO food is becoming a demand amongst their consumers with sales of products with a “Non-GMO” verification label spiking between 15 percent and 30 percent.

Protest organizers, who have made it their mission to protect the food supply from further contamination, said they would be present for the third year running at Monsanto’s shareholders’ meeting in January 2014. 

~ Associated Press contributed to this story

This article is the copyrighted property of the writer and Communities @ WashingtonTimes.com. Written permission must be obtained before reprint in online or print media. REPRINTING TWTC CONTENT WITHOUT PERMISSION AND/OR PAYMENT IS THEFT AND PUNISHABLE BY LAW.

More from Ingredients for Healthy Living
 
blog comments powered by Disqus
Jessica Claire Haney

 

This holistic mom dreams of a day when all kids -- and adults -- eat foods with only recognizable ingredients. Paying attention is not an option for me; it's a necessity.

A few years ago, my body started breaking down and let me know I wasn’t like all those other Jessicas who were still in their twenties. I began making the rounds of alternative health practitioners and nutritionists to deal with stomach problems, thyroid problems, chronic grumpiness, and infertility, issues that my doctors weren't addressing with any success. With a lot of help and a bunch of lifestyle changes, I managed to work my way back to healthy and happy. And pregnant!

Now a full-on convert to natural family living and a mom to a three-year-old, I’m on a mission to share my insights -- and my persistent questions -- about nutrition and holistic health with other moms and with anyone else looking for something that will work and feel good when other stuff doesn’t. As a leader of a local chapter of Holistic Moms Network, I've tried to build a community that supports other parents in making healthy decisions for their families.

My writing has appeared in parenting publications and poetry journals. I blog about life on the alternative/mainstream divide at Crunchy-Chewy Mama, and I'm a contributor for DC Metro Moms.

Contact Jessica Claire Haney

Error

Please enable pop-ups to use this feature, don't worry you can always turn them off later.

Question of the Day
Featured
Photo Galleries
Popular Threads
Powered by Disqus