The Planner: Alexandra Swann's novel on Agenda 21

What would happen if government tried to fix Social Security and Medicare through the confiscation of property? Photo: Stefan Swann

OHATCHEE, Ala., November 4, 2013 — People aren’t always thrilled with policies that promise an increase in government authority — ostensibly for their own good — as soon as these policies are realized. Obamacare’s unpopularity is proof of that.

People will feel the same when the insidious U.N. Agenda 21, the “global partnership for sustainable development,” has been implemented. Seeing the outcome realized in someone else’s life — such as the fictional life of real-estate-agent-turned-federal-bureaucrat Kris Mitchell — gives obscure politics daily relevance. This is the basis of Alexandra Swann’s novel, The Planner.


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The book begins unremarkably, with Kris Mitchell appearing as a relatable, politically apathetic United States citizen trying to find a secure job. When she becomes a Level 1 Planner for the Federal Municipal Planning Division, her job is to recruit seniors to sign over their assets to the government in exchange for a remaining lifetime in a green community that will take the place of Social Security and Medicare payments.

The politics gets personal when Kris has to reside in the same environment and brings her own parents to section W of the Smart Seniors community.

“I thought it would be interesting to depict what would happen if the government actually had a plan to ‘fix’ Medicare and Social Security through the confiscation of property,” explains Swann. “I also wanted people to begin to understand the real world consequences of Agenda 21 and what will happen to freedom if it is ever fully implemented.”

ALEXANDRA SWANN: “We are piling on more and more big government, and we have an increasing divide between people who think government is the savior and people who are very suspicious of it.”


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Perhaps most shocking is just how believable the story is, along with its cast of familiar characters: gun-toting father Jim, conspiracy theorizing brother Keith, wise and level-headed activist Lena, crass and overbearing civil service woman Pat, and the enigmatic and handsome Doctor Michael Linton.

As more people trade private property and responsibility for the presumed security of complete dependency on the federal government, things get eerie.

Life in the government-controlled housing becomes more strictly regulated and less comfortable, while the highest level bureaucrats enjoy living off the victims’ property confiscated by eminent domain.


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Some have called the novel “treasonous.”

“I knew that kind of response was coming,” Swann admits, “and I was prepared for it. What I was not prepared for was the praise the book has received from so many bloggers and readers who say that it is really unique because it shows how we gradually lose our freedoms one bad choice at a time.”

When we learn how the morally relativistic decisions she has made even in her personal life have paved the way for her to assist a tyrannical nightmare, Kris Mitchell effectively becomes a metaphor for America. We do not fully realize the value of our heritage until we have lost it.

The Planner seems futuristic at first, but the further one reads, the closer it becomes. The year is only 2014. The president is never mentioned by name, but one can’t help but read his speeches in President Obama’s voice.

“People remember stories much better than facts,” Swann says. “I always wanted to write fiction that impacted people because what we see for entertainment has such a huge impact on our world view. If you look at the secularization of our society, our entertainment has played a major role in accomplishing it. My goal is to tell stories that make people think about where we are and where we are headed if we don’t make changes.”

Swann has been a noteworthy author among homeschool pioneers in the past couple of decades, memorable for earning a master’s degree at the age of 16. Her experience in the mortgage industry provided her with insight into the globalist, American sovereignty-challenging policies inspired by Agenda 21.

It began with her research into the Dodd Frank bill in 2010. 

“As I began to read the law I understood that one of the true goals, at least as the mortgage parts of the law are concerned, was to deter home ownership, but I could not understand what the end goal was,” says Swann.

“Then in the fall of 2010 Chris Dodd introduced a final bill, The Livable Communities Act, which would provide federal funding for Smart Growth and Agenda 21-style development across the nation. This was to be his final ‘signature’ bill, and when I read what it entailed I started putting the pieces together. From there, I began to learn about Agenda 21, which was actually coming to El Paso in 2011.

“In May of 2011, on a Saturday, I was driving a loan application package to UPS and on the way there and back I developed the complete story line for The Planner.”

In a mere forty-five minutes, Swann had the major scenes, plot line, and characters — except for Michael Linton — prepared. “That is the only time I have ever had this experience,” says Swann. “Every other book I have ever worked on evolved as I wrote it.”

Swann began committing the story to paper in January 2012 and completed it in five months.

Since then, Swann has authored The Chosen, a sequel to The Planner, which includes the National Defense Authorization Act in its plotline, and The Force, co-authored with Joyce Swann, a novel set in 2041 about “Secretary-General of the Club of Rome…proposing a means to reduce the world’s population to between 500 million and 1 billion people in order to create the ‘sustainable future’ that environmentalists seek.”

“We are piling on more and more big government,” Swann observes, “and we have an increasing divide between people who think government is the savior and people who are very suspicious of it.”

C.S. Lewis observed, “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive.”

 

Amanda Read is a columnist for the Communities at The Washington Times. Trained as a historian, skilled as a writer, and aspiring to be a filmmaker, Amanda investigates the ideas behind contemporary culture and politics. A professional writer and researcher, she is also a Christian homeschool graduate, unconventional college graduate, military daughter, and eldest of the nine Read children at Fair Hills Farm. Find more of her work at www.amandaread.com.


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Amanda Read

Amanda Read is a columnist for the Communities at The Washington Times. Trained as a historian, skilled as a writer, and aspiring to be a filmmaker, Amanda investigates the ideas behind contemporary culture and politics. A professional writer and researcher, she is also a Christian homeschool graduate, unconventional college graduate, military daughter, and eldest of the nine Read children at Fair Hills Farm. Find more of her work at www.amandaread.com

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