Real estate in 3D: Walking through a borderless world

3D isn’t just for the movies. It might be the next big thing for marketing real estate. Photo: Shutterstock/123rf.com

MANILA, Philippines, July 26, 2013 — Whenever people talk about innovation, everything seems to go around the 3D platform. From the movies people watch to the games children play online up to the marketing expositions of the most driven entrepreneurs, 3D seems to have secured a good place.

Justin Slick, a computer graphics engineer and contributor for about.com defines 3D as, “Any object that occurs on a three-axis Cartesian coordinate system.”


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In the advent of varied medium of communication, marketers started lurking in, setting up websites, and posting ads in newspapers and the like. This has increased the awareness of buyers and in the same vein became a downfall for traditional marketers. The year 2004 saw the blossoming of the real estate market in the country. This led to an even stronger impact of internet websites containing voluminous information about the former.

However, the internet that helped marketers cater the information needs of clients became their biggest competitor when potential buyers started a do-it yourself method of accomplishing things. Despite the previous recession, people are still into buying houses. This is what fortifies the goal of realtors to continue improving the way they present their products so that more people will be reinvigorated to invest their hard earned money. One of the many favorable concepts of realtors is the use of 3D game engines when presenting and visualizing commercial real estate. This innovation hopes to provide a so-called augmented reality platform for real estate marketing.

“The marketing in the commercial real estate industry is absolutely abysmal” said Dave, co-founder and CEO of Floored, in an interview with TechCrunch. “The two-dimensional floor plan has not evolved in decades”, he added. ”This, however, is gradually changing due to the dawn of 3D presentations. 3D presentations are causing uproar in the real estate market due to their promising functionality. While not yet totally sold out with the idea of 3D, one must deem it interesting to understand what 3D is.       

In its most comprehensive definition, 3D computer graphics are graphics that use a three-dimensional illustration of data kept in the computer for the purposes of performing calculations. 3D mapping allows images to be projected in the real world. It produces certain emotionality on the part of its audience as it offers a different viewing experience. Before jumping into visualizing and designing one’s real estate marketing presentation though, it is essential that people involved in this industry breakdown the good and the bad about 3D projection. 


SEE RELATED: Boost real estate property value with landscaping


The Good

3D projection is believed to be the future of real estate marketing and is the key to catapulting the real estate market back to where it used to be. With its no nonsense and fast paced rendering phase, developers can have such a breezy time visualizing their ideas as compared to relying on Auto CAD. 3D Game Engine Projection may not be originally designed for real estate marketing but it has shown great promise when it comes to doing the job. 

Also, most 3D game engines do not have issues such as complexity levels. Although the use of 3D Technology in presenting virtual buildings has conventionally been hindered by extended rendering times, and the non-interactiveness of a pre-rendered walkthrough, new 3D game Engines are able to handle such difficulty. The over-all abilities of this engine promises not only enthusiasm among potential buyers but their clear conversion to actual and devoted clients. 

The Bad

3D projection with its practically omnipotent abilities comes with an equally high price. 3D is expensive, but it’s only a matter of whether a developer is willing to shell out a serious amount of money to have it or not. It also requires a great deal of technical know-how and a team of highly skilled individuals to fulfill the job. 

The Verdict?

Technology indeed has successfully inserted itself to the stack of this generation’s necessities. The once seemingly tedious process of marketing products is now just a click away. True enough, people are finding more and more ways to create a borderless world. No plan is too big to realize and no idea is too huge to be put to a halt anymore. So is 3D the future of real estate marketing? In a way, it’s already happening at present as some are already venturing into it. Although it’s not being fully used in real estate marketing, its future looks bright.

As a whole, 3D models are used in an extensive range of fields today. The film industry uses such models as objects for both real-life and animated motion pictures. The video game industry uses 3D models as resources for computer and video games. In the field of science, they are used as highly detailed mock-ups of chemical compounds. In medicine, schools and hospitals use comprehensive models of organs. 

The architecture industry uses these models to exhibit projected edifices and landscapes. The engineering community uses them as designs of new devices, automobiles and buildings and the list goes on. Nowadays, the field of geology has started to create 3D models as a standard practice. 

The whole concept of 3D definitely has a lot of potential in many ways. Who knows, maybe the next innovation in the years to come would already include holography and all the other promising 3D concepts.

 


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Jona Jone

Jona Miranda Jone brings her expertise to the Communities page as a financial writer who is also an expert on mortgages and other transactions concerning property ownership.  Jona now lives in the Philippines, where she works as a freelance writer.

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