Atheism versus God: How did the universe begin?

Could the universe just pop into existence? Photo: NASA, ESA and J. Hester (ASU)

MOSCOW, October 28, 2011 ─ There are those who claim that to believe in God is not only unscientific, but also absurd.

This is certainly not the case. To the contrary, it is the denial of God’s existence that contradicts both science and common sense.

This becomes apparent when we consider any of the great issues of existence. Take, for instance, the question of the universe’s beginning.

The prevailing scientific consensus today is that the universe began with the Big Bang. There are two main reasons for why scientists believe this.

The first is Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, whose equations suggest that the universe began from an ultra-dense point at some time in the past.

The Big Bang: Did it just happen by itself? (Image by NASA)

The Big Bang: Did it just happen by itself? (Image by NASA)

Secondly, astronomical observations confirm the universe is expanding in all directions. When we extrapolate this process backward, we arrive at an infinitesimally small dot of immense density at a definite point in time past. That point is – according to scientists – the location of the Big Bang.

The Big Bang theory describes the initial event as a great explosion which brought forth all the energy and matter in the universe. On this theory, the Big Bang was the beginning of all things. Prior to it, there was nothing: There were no particles, there was no matter. There was not even space or time.

Most of those who don’t believe in God say that the Big Bang was a chance event. In other words, the great explosion that brought the universe into being was a cosmic fluke.

But this is an unsupportable position to take, because things just don’t happen like that. Explosions – big or small – do not come about without someone or something causing them.

To illustrate, consider this.

Imagine you are visiting a friend and you decide to take a walk. As you stride down the street, you suddenly hear a deafening bang behind you. You turn around and you see evidence of a powerful explosion that brought down buildings and toppled cars.

You turn to your friend and blurt out, “Who did this?”

Your friend looks at you, shrugs his shoulders and says, “Nobody.”

Seeing your incredulity, the friend continues, “Why, in our town explosions just happen like that.”

Such a reply would immediately make you suspect your friend has lost his mind. Why? Because we know very well that explosions do not happen of themselves.

And yet many atheists make precisely this kind of claim. They say that the greatest of all explosions just happened. On this view, the universe just popped into existence spontaneously.

But does this make sense?

Common sense and experience tell us that the world does not work like this. Things just do not pop into being. Even children know this. If someone would claim spontaneous creation in connection with any other event, we would immediately think he has lost his senses.

But this is not the worst of it. The atheist claim also directly contradicts the most fundamental assumptions and observations of science. This is paradoxical, since most people of atheist persuasion say that they have arrived at their position on the basis of science and reason.

The problem is, however, that in all of its history science has never observed or documented a single uncaused event.

Everything that science has observed so far – whether on this planet or in the universe at large – has been subject to the cause-effect relationship.

The cause-effect principle is, in fact, a foundational axiom of science. Every time scientists see an event take place anywhere in the universe, they automatically assume it can be explained in terms of cause and effect.

The atheistic position concerning the beginning of the universe thus goes not only against common sense and our everyday experience, but also against the axioms and observations of science.

In light of this, it is the atheist’s position that has an air of absurdness about it.

It is only reasonable and logical to assume that the universe – just like everything else – had to have a cause. Judging by the staggering vastness, complexity and beauty of the universe, the cause that brought it forth must have been immensely powerful, superbly wise and exquisitely imaginative.

Such characteristics are normally associated with an entity we term God.

To believe in God – the transcendent cause of the universe – is thus neither illogical nor absurd. Not to believe in him is both.

Unbelief will remain to be logically and scientifically untenable until it can be demonstrated that it is possible for an uncaused event to occur.

_____________

Born and raised under communism, Vasko Kohlmayer is a naturalized American citizen. He has lived in several countries under various forms of government, but he still marvels at the goodness of God and the wonder of life.

He has written for a number of newspapers, magazines and internet journals. Vasko currently lives in Europe with his long-suffering wife and two beautiful daughters. He is the founder of The Christian Writers Foundation.

You can read more by Vasko at http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/vasko-kohlmayers-globe

 

 


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Vasko Kohlmayer

Born and raised under communism, Vasko Kohlmayer is a naturalized American citizen. He has lived in several countries under various forms of government, but he still marvels at the goodness of God and the wonder of life. He has discovered that no matter how many places you've been, there is always something new to learn wherever you go.

Having started with sciences, he earned degrees in philosophy and literature. He has written for a number of newspapers, magazines and internet journals on subjects ranging from Russian politics to the gold standard. Vasko currently lives in Europe with his long-suffering wife and two beautiful daughters. He is the founder of The Christian Writers Foundation.  

 

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