Ben Carson attacks Obamacare, hints at political ambition

Neurosurgeon to retire from medicine to pursue Photo: Carson Scholars Fund

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md., March 16, 2013 — Dr. Ben Carson electrified the Conservative Political Action Committee (CPAC) conference audience this morning by addressing once again the issue that has catapulted him into national headlines: his staunch opposition to Obamacare. 

Carson persists in his strong belief that if government overreach can overwhelm individual healthcare and the healthcare business—one-sixth of the national economy—then there will be no limit on the job-stifling growth of government bureaucracy. 


SEE RELATED: Tea Party at CPAC: Newt Gingrich, Michelle Bachman, and Scott Walker


In addition, Carson fears the manipulative nature of Obamacare legislation which coerces individuals and businesses to hand over a significant portion of their earnings to support the government’s increasingly hydra-headed reach. “Businesses are not in business for social engineering,” he declared. Carson’s own general prescription for health coverage would encompass a significant expansion of individual health savings accounts. In addition, the government must start to “treat businesses as our friends and not our enemies.” 

Carson first catapulted into the national headlines earlier this year when he delivered a stinging criticism of Obamacare in front of the President at the Annual National Prayer breakfast. Since that time, he’s become a new favorite of conservatives and libertarians alike while at the same time being demonized by Democrats and the leftist punditocracy.


For continuing WTC coverage of CPAC 2013, follow this link.


SEE RELATED: Mitch McConnell tells CPAC: Obamacare is an “assault on liberty”



Carson also addressed another rising concern of conservatives and religious Americans alike—the left’s escalating war on God and specifically their constant attacks on Christianity. “We have to resist this war on God,” he said. Those on the political left, he said, “Don’t want to talk about God, don’t EVER want us to say the name of Jesus Christ… We have to resist this war on God.”

“Note to the PC police: don’t you be coming down on people who believe in God and believe in Jesus,” he said, blaming professional political elites and their media enablers for promoting social division as a path to power. “The olitical class derives its power by creating friction. The media does, too, creating a chasm between people, he said. But we are closer to others than not… We are not each other’s enemies in this country.”

Perhaps the most interesting news item in this segment, however, arose in a brief Q&A with Dr. Carson, emceed by Eric Metaxas. Carson confirmed that “in 106 days,” he’ll retire from his neurosurgical practice at the age of 62. “I’d much rather quite while I’m on the top of my game,” he said.

“Are you leaving medicine so you can do other things in the political sphere?” challenged Metaxas. Carson tossed back a humorous but noncomittal response, which Metaxas openly interpreted as a yes—a speculation that the audience greeted with entusiastic applause.

For a Fox video featuring Dr. Ben Carson’s speech, follow this link.

 

Read more of Terry’s news and reviews at Curtain Up! in the Entertain Us neighborhood of the Washington Times Communities. For Terry’s investing and political insights, visit his Communities columns, The Prudent Man and Morning Market Maven, in Business.

Follow Terry on Twitter @terryp17

 


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More from Conservative Political Action Committee - CPAC 2013 March 14-16
 
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Terry Ponick

Now writing on investing, politics, music, movies and theater for the Washington Times Communities, Terry was formerly the longtime music and culture critic for the Washington Times print edition (1994-2009) before moving online with Communities in 2010.  

 

 

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