Asking Aaron Clarey: Does college prepare people for the real world?

It is a tough question. Captain Capitalism shares his answers. Photo: Photo used with permission of Aaron Clarey; photographer's name not provided

FLORIDA, May 24, 2013 — Even if a college education does not measure up to its financial cost, some say that it is nonetheless valuable. This is because four years on a college campus is sure to expose people to diverse cultures, lifestyles and philosophies. In short, it is likely to prepare young adults for the real world. Is this actually the case?

Taking the socioeconomic value of most college degrees into account, what should young adults in modern America do to further their education?

What role does political correctness play in determining popular ideas about college’s socioeconomic value? It is frequently said that in order to get a decent job today, one must have a college degree. What can be said about this view?

Aaron Clarey is one of the most outspoken voices to have emerged from the Great Recession Era. While most might know him as Captain Capitalism, a title which leaves little to the imagination about his philosophy, he is also a fossil hunter and tornado chaser who teaches ballroom dancing.

Only in America.

He is also the author of Worthless, a highly popular ebook which details the often overlooked or unmentioned pitfalls of college education. In this second part of our discussion, Clarey answers the questions listed above.

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Joseph F. Cotto: Even if a college education does not measure up to its financial cost, some say that it is nonetheless valuable. This is because four years on a college campus is sure to expose people to diverse cultures, lifestyles, and philosophies. In short, it is likely to prepare young adults for the real world. Do you think that this is actually the case?

Aaron Clarey: It’s a bold faced lie by the education industry.  They make it sound like you sit at home in your parent’s basement and only watch “Leave it to Beaver.”  That the only way you’re ever going to get any experience in life is through them.  And to claim college is “the real world” is laughable.  It’s a playground for worthless academians who don’t want to and are incapable of working real jobs, and instead merely pontificate while playing over-paid baby sitter to a bunch of late teens and early 20 somethings.

Cotto: Taking the socioeconomic value of most college degrees into account, what would you recommend that young adults in modern America do to further their education?

Clarey: For now, and until the labor market improves, I would recommend focusing on skills and trades.  Go to tech school or plumber school or some kind of short term program so that you can develop an employable trade.  And if you don’t even know what you want to do for a living, then don’t even bother going to college.  Find a job, go out into the REAL real world and get some REAL real world experience before deciding what you want to be your profession.  I would also (as I always do) recommend the military.  It is a great place to start. 

Cotto: What role would you say that political correctness plays in determining popular ideas about college’s socioeconomic value?

Clarey: I would say very little.  Political correctness and politics at large do play a role in college.  Primarily one of brainwashing, indoctrination and a means to employ worthless leftists who have no real tangible skill in the form of professors and college administrators.  But as for the socioeconomic value political correctness, if anything, harms the value of a degree in that it lessens the college experience and truly shuts down young people’s minds.

Cotto: It is frequently said that in order to get a decent job today, one must have a college degree. What are your opinions regarding this view?

Clarey: It’s not only factually wrong, it’s a purposeful lie.  Factually you don’t need a college degree.  You need a skill, you need a trade, and this CAN come from getting a college degree, but you don’t NEED to go to college. A tech school, an apprenticeship, heck, even living at home in your mother’s basement working at Starbucks fresh out of high school will put you financially ahead of any liberal arts major.  But it is also a lie told by professors, college administrators and others who need to keep up the lie so they can get paid for their largely worthless work.


Far-left? Far-right? Get realRead more from “The Conscience of a Realist” by Joseph F. Cotto 


 


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Joseph Cotto

Joseph F. Cotto is a social journalist by trade and student of history by lifestyle choice. He hails from central Florida, writing about political, economic, and social issues of the day. In the past, he was a contributor to Blogcritics Magazine, among other publications. He is currently at work on a book about American society.

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