Jason Richwine: The latest victim of left-wing creationism

The former Heritage Foundation scholar's immigration report was factual, but facts are not welcome at the altar of secular leftism. Photo: YouTube

FLORIDA, May 15, 2013 — By now, most people probably know who Jason Richwine is.

The brain behind the Heritage Foundation’s recent study about immigration amnesty, he has become an unintentional celebrity due to his views on IQ and its relation to demographic groups. In the past, he claimed that certain ethnic and racial groups have higher or lower IQs than others do. His doctoral dissertation — at Harvard, no less — focused on the intelligence levels of immigrants from various countries.

This all seemed to be well and good for Heritage. The conservative think tank hired Richwine over three years ago, and he seems to have gotten along well there. It was only until the open borders crowd started their usual grievance-peddling that a serious problem developed.

Essentially, Richwine was accused of being a racist. His findings also noted ethnic differences in IQ, but his detractors seem not to care much for the facts. As merely acknowledging statistical data can lead to the racist label being sewn across one’s shirt, Richwine’s naysayers were somewhat easy to ignore.

Then something else came up.


SEE RELATED: Heritage Foundation’s immigration study, Jason Richwine and IQ


It is quite devastating: Richwine has written for an online paleoconservative publication owned by white nationalists. As soon as his opponents got whiff of this, the game was over. He resigned from Heritage last week.      

Richwine’s decision to contribute to such a website is troubling. However, such personal misfortune ought not be confused with his scientific findings. Since the Heritage report was released, it has revealed a slew of hard, but predictable truths about the folly of granting amnesty to illegal aliens.

Perhaps the most damaging aspect of the Richwine situation is that it has been an invitation to open borders fanatics, anti-intelligence crusaders and an array of social misfits masquerading as well-meaning activists with the opportunity to deride IQ’s genetic components. Absurd and downright untruthful as their rhetoric might be, the facts will not bend to the whim of political correctness.

For instance, it is a fact that genes play a large role in determining the intelligence of any given person. A 2011 study published in Molecular Psychiatry indicated that more than half of a person’s IQ can be attributed to genetic factors. Going back several decades, before the Nazis warped genetic science into a fantasy for rationalizing genocide, most of the developed world pursued its research with a passion.

Many, who happen to be among Richwine’s fiercest critics, believe that intelligence and heredity have nothing to do with one another. This belief is held with a religious conviction; the sort of thing that cares not a whit for logic or reason. As intelligence is the quintessential matter of logic and reason, those who have no use for either cannot be expected to evaluate IQ in a reliable fashion. 

This can be chalked up to the Church of Equality. Unlike most Americans, the Church defines “equality” not in terms of a level playing field, but a level quality of life. This means that there are no such things as differences in aptitude, economic power, or social standing. 

All who sit in the Church’s pews are one and the same, regardless of the fact that they are obviously different from one another.

Oops! There go those dreaded facts again. The high priests and priestesses of the CoE will have absolutely none of those. Dissent is for thinking people and Church-mandated equality has no patience for that element.

After all, if one is a deep thinker, then he or she probably has a moderate-to-high IQ. Does that have nothing to do with the structure of the brain? Does that structure have nothing to do with the blueprint - the genes - upon which it is built? Do we honestly believe that the only reason the people around us can’t do theoretical physics and learn a dozen languages and compose symphies at age four is that they didn’t get the right upbringing? Might there be some sort of correlation of intelligence to brain to genes?

The truth dare not be mentioned.

The secular faith-based mantra that everybody can do everything boils down to, more or less, a leftist brand of creationism. While many on the right believe that the god of Abrahamic religion built the universe through intelligent design, evolutionary science has utterly refuted this claim. Likewise, it is now in the process of rebuking the atheistic deity of tabula rasa via sociobiology and evolutionary psychology.

As one can surely tell, science cares not a whit for leftist or rightist ideologies.

Simply put, Jason Richwine is a heretic to the CoE. Therefore, its members, bounding with zeal derived from their man-made mysticism, are determined to purge him from polite society. They might have driven him out of Heritage, but something tells me that he will be back in the halls of scholasticism in short order.

He should apologize for contributing to that website, though. He should also never, ever do it again. 

That unfortunate business aside, Richwine’s research will survive or fail according to its scientific merits, not according to the passions of the media and people who wouldn’t know a variance from a lawnmower. How long can the stone cold truth be avoided, especially when all that stands in it way are a pack of lies designed to make people feel better about themselves?

Emotion is strong, but only temporary. Reason, unpopular as it may be, lasts forever.


Far-left? Far-right? Get realRead more from “The Conscience of a Realist” by Joseph F. Cotto 

 


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Joseph Cotto

Joseph F. Cotto is a social journalist by trade and student of history by lifestyle choice. He hails from central Florida, writing about political, economic, and social issues of the day. In the past, he was a contributor to Blogcritics Magazine, among other publications. He is currently at work on a book about American society.

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