Asking Robert Zimmerman: Who is George Zimmerman?

A candid discussion with the brother of the man who fatally shot Trayvon Martin. Photo: Photo used with permission of Robert Zimmerman; photographer's name not provided

FLORIDA, June 6, 2013 — Much has been said about George Zimmerman. 


SEE RELATED: Guns, weed and more: The inconvenient truth about Trayvon Martin


Some have implied that Zimmerman is a racist. Others point to his history of involvement in his community. What inspired his civic participation? Prior to the Trayvon Martin shooting, what sort of aspirations did he have for the future?  

Since George was arrested, his brother Robert has become one of his strongest defenders. What has it been like to play such a public role?

What role have national media organizations had on the Martin shooting’s aftermath? Does Robert believe the national media has been fair to his brother? 

Many in the national media have said a great deal about Sanford; very little of it seems to be positive. How has the Martin shooting impacted this central Florida port city?

In this first part of our discussion, Robert Zimmerman answers these questions and more.

**** 

Joseph F. Cotto: Much has been said about your brother George Zimmerman. How would you describe his personality?

Robert Zimmerman: I think George is a protector. Clearly, he was discouraged [at] the notion of a gated (at least partially) community being overrun by crime. I think being the [first] to approach the police to establish a neighborhood watch speaks volumes about his character. He was the [first to] aid his neighbors, and in addition to averting crimes in progress had the trust of his neighbors.

Cotto: Some have implied that your brother is a racist. What do you have to say about this claim?

Zimmerman: I am concerned the new standard has devolved to accusing someone of racism [without] grounds and then to demand they retroactively prove racism is an unwarranted charge. George is not only a proven non-racist but I’d have a more difficult time than him demonstrating the same.

Cotto: Your brother has a history of involvement in his community. Do you know what inspired his civic participation?

Zimmerman: I think we grew up in a community [without] “gates” and we felt very safe in our neighborhood. George moved to [Retreat at Twin Lakes] which was dubbed a “gated” community which implies there is some implied insulation from crime. George experienced the most crime in his life at the RTL [and] I think he genuinely believes vigilance [and] communication between neighbors were the keys to addressing the problem.

Cotto: Prior to the Trayvon Martin shooting, what sort of aspirations did your brother have for the future? 

Zimmerman: My brother visited me when he interviewed for the Prince William County Police Department [and] was seemingly interested in the criminal justice field generally. We both learned from our father (VA Magistrate) that law enforcement was a balancing act between the rights of the accused & the law. Following the letter of the law was our dad’s description of what made a good LEO or Judge. 

Eventually, George would have probably pursued law school [and] then after practicing law he may have set his sights on becoming a judge or magistrate. Judges are not people who incarcerate people - often, they correct egregious miscarriages of justice.

Cotto: Since your bother was arrested, you have become one of his strongest defenders. What has it been like to play such a public role?

Zimmerman: It is a role that I view as a duty; a duty to my brother, but also my family and my country. George is 100% innocent and he would have done exactly the same for me had I been the victim of political persecution.

Cotto: While writing in support of your brother, you have highlighted data relating to violent crime in America. This, in turn, generated immense controversy. Why do you suppose that this is?

Zimmerman: NO COMMENT

Cotto: In your opinion, what role have national media organizations had on the Martin shooting’s aftermath?

Zimmerman: The media acted with incompetence when they accepted the false narrative of persons with a financial interest in presenting a false narrative as truth.

Cotto: Generally speaking, do you believe that the national media have been fair to your brother? 

Zimmerman: Absolutely not. The bias drives ratings [and] in turn: profits. Their continual deception by repeating George “continued to follow despite being advised not to” is not based in fact. The media made a lot of money portraying George as a racist and did so with reckless disregard.

Cotto: Have you noticed any differences between local and national reportage of the Martin shooting?

Zimmerman: NO COMMENT

Cotto: Many in the national media have said a great deal about Sanford; very little of it seems to be positive. From your perspective, how has the Martin shooting impacted this city?

Zimmerman: The people of Sanford deserved to hear the truth consistently: George had defended himself and had committed no crime and should not be charged. Despite a seemingly controversial assertion at the time, the police department and State Attorney’s office was acting ethically and honoring their oath. Politics came into play and confused the people of Sanford.


Far-left? Far-right? Get realRead more from “The Conscience of a Realist” by Joseph F. Cotto 


 


This article is the copyrighted property of the writer and Communities @ WashingtonTimes.com. Written permission must be obtained before reprint in online or print media. REPRINTING TWTC CONTENT WITHOUT PERMISSION AND/OR PAYMENT IS THEFT AND PUNISHABLE BY LAW.

More from The Conscience of a Realist
 
blog comments powered by Disqus
Joseph Cotto

Joseph F. Cotto is a social journalist by trade and student of history by lifestyle choice. He hails from central Florida, writing about political, economic, and social issues of the day. In the past, he was a contributor to Blogcritics Magazine, among other publications. He is currently at work on a book about American society.

Contact Joseph Cotto

Error

Please enable pop-ups to use this feature, don't worry you can always turn them off later.

Question of the Day
Featured
Photo Galleries
Popular Threads
Powered by Disqus