Decreasing Iraq troops places American soldiers at risk

President Obama may be trying to keep a 2008 campaign promise to remove our troops from Iraq however the war in Iraq is not over, and troops are still being attacked and dying. Photo: Associated Press

PHOENIX, September 14, 2011President Obama’s announcement that only 3,000 troops will be left in Iraq by the end of the year heralds a serious and dangerous downgrade from the current 45,000 troops, spelling disaster for our soldiers. According to a FOXNEWS report, President Obama’s military commanders are livid over this recent decision – a decision that Defense Secretary, Leon Panetta, allegedly gave signature to.

President Obama may be trying to keep a 2008 campaign promise to remove our troops from Iraq however the problems is that regardless of what some misguided people may say, the war in Iraq is not over, there are current combat operations still occurring there. American troops are still being attacked and dying.

By leaving only 3,000 troops in a combat zone will save billions and billions of dollars.  But, what is the real cost?  American military lives are the cost.

According to Department of Defense data, there are nearly 10,000 US troops in both England and Italy, which are non-combat zone. The last time there were more than that amount was during World War II. There are over 8,000 troops in Qatar and over 10,000 in Kuwait.  Guam has over 2,800 of our troops stationed there.

How does President Obama think that 3,000 troops can control an active combat zone where the current 45,000 troops are still facing death each day? 

U.S Army Soldiers are seen during the hand-over ceremony of a military base in Basra, 340 miles (550 kilometers) southeast of Baghdad, Iraq, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011. The American ambassador to Iraq on Wednesday dismissed a proposal to keep as few as 3,000 troops as not credible, signaling a debate between President Obama's advisers in Baghdad and Washington of the U.S. military's future in Iraq with time running out to decide. (AP Photo/Nabil al-Jurani)

U.S Army Soldiers are seen during the hand-over ceremony of a military base in Basra, Iraq on Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011. The American ambassador to Iraq on Wednesday dismissed a proposal to keep as few as 3,000 troops as not credible, signaling a debate between President Obama’s advisers in Baghdad and Washington of the U.S. military’s future in Iraq with time running out to decide. (Image: Associated Press)

By leaving only, 3,000 troops behind, President Obama is simply leaving those soldiers stranded in the cross hairs while sending the message that our military are expendable political pawns in the presidential re-election campaign.

And what is the cost to the military men and women stranded in Iraq?

According to data from the Department of Veterans Affairs, returning veterans from the current Iraq and Afghanistan wars are suffering from unusually high levels of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). They report up to 20% of returning vets suffer from PTSD; civilian medical researchers claim the number may be higher than the 30% suffered by Vietnam vets.

 In their report, anger is one of the most common symptoms of PTSD. The reasons that are given for the anger range from faulty equipment, poor mission planning, to the appearance of lack of support or indifference from the highest levels of command, i.e. President Obama.

Simply, President Obama has a history of not listening to the military commanders who have the experience to conduct proper warfare strategies.  For example, hesitating for months about a minimum 40,000 troop increase for Afghanistan in April of 2009, an increase strongly requested by General Stanley McChrystal, President Obama’s finally authorized an of 20,000 to 30,000 troop in the last week of November, 2009, leaving the troops without support for seven months.

Under President Obama, the last two years of combat in Afghanistan have resulted in more troop deaths than we had suffered during the previous ten years, and according to Defense Department budget figures, the cost for the Afghan war has doubled under the present administration.  

 The bottom line is either we conduct a total war, such as Generals Grant and Eisenhower conducted, resulting in decisive annihilation of our enemies, or we get out.  The politically correct war of the last three years protects politicians, not troops.

Our troops are all that matter and we should condemn anyone who would try to stand in their way. Pray for the remaining 3,000 troops “left behind”.

We the people, and our prayers, may be their only remaining support.

Email Henry D’Andrea at tips@politicons.net and follow Henry D’Andrea on Twitter (@TheHenry) here.


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Henry D'Andrea

Henry D'Andrea is a Conservative columnist and commentator. He writes a weekly column at the Washington Times Communities called "The Conscience of a Conservative," which features his commentary on current events and political stories from a conservative perspective. He often writes on foreign policy, domestic and economic issues, the conservative movement, and elections.

 

D’Andrea has been a guest on many radio shows throughout the country since writing columns at the Washington Times Communities. His work has been featured in many publications, including Townhall.com, Commentary Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The Tea Party Review Magazine, Big Government, Big Journalism, The Gateway Pundit, Instapundit, and many more.

 

Feel free to contact Henry D'Andrea at writedandrea@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter: @TheHenry 

 

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