Obama’s dismal ratings show unlikely sign of re-election

The latest polling data puts a dark cloud over President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election bid as President Obama’s second term is becoming more unlikely as the days pass.
Photo: Associated Press

PHOENIX, August 8, 2011 — The latest polling data puts a dark cloud over President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election bid. 

With strongly dismal ratings in key swing states and a national approval rating of 42%, President Obama’s second term is becoming more unlikely as the days pass. 

Just last week a poll out of the key state of Florida revealed that 50% of Floridians believe that Obama does not deserve to be reelected.

Even worse for Obama was the 61% disapproval among Florida Independents, up from 47% in May. If he doesn’t carry the independents in Florida, he can count on a red win in Florida next November.

Another poll, this time from Pennsylvania, has even worse news for Obama.

Pennsylvania voters say by a 52-42 percent margin that Obama does not deserve to be reelected.    

Pennsylvania independents express disapproval-approval ratings of Obama of 45–44 percent, Republicans 85–10 percent and Democrats 19–74 percent.

In another key state, Ohio, Obama has a 49% disapproval rating. Amongst Independents, 55% disapprove of his performance, with only 37% approving.

As mentioned before, if independent voters are turning on Obama, he can’t pull off a win, especially they so strongly disapprove of him in these key re-election states.

President Obama won these key states in 2008. So did Bush in 2004 and Clinton in 1996.

The Democratic ticket, with President Obama at the lead, can only win re election if they can do what they did before.

The Democratic ticket, with President Obama at the lead, can only win re election if they can do what they did before.

 

Obama must retain Florida, Pennsylvania, and Ohio in 2012, or he will not win re-election. 

Looking at statistics nationally, Obama gets hit hard with only a 42% approval rating according to the latest Gallup survey. However, the most damning survey shows that 40% strongly disapprove of President Obama’s job performance so far. Only 24% strongly approve. 

If 40% strongly disapprove, how could he win re-election? That’s nearly half of the national electorate. 

The clear reason for Obama’s dismal ratings is the economy. With the recent news of 9.1% unemployment and for the first time in U.S. history, the loss of America’s AAA rating, Americans don’t trust Obama in his leadership role.

President Obama must change course or he’ll doom his own re-election bid and quite possibly the United States.

Email Henry D’Andrea at tips@politicons.net Follow him on Twitter @TheHenry


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Henry D'Andrea

Henry D'Andrea is a Conservative columnist and commentator. He writes a weekly column at the Washington Times Communities called "The Conscience of a Conservative," which features his commentary on current events and political stories from a conservative perspective. He often writes on foreign policy, domestic and economic issues, the conservative movement, and elections.

 

D’Andrea has been a guest on many radio shows throughout the country since writing columns at the Washington Times Communities. His work has been featured in many publications, including Townhall.com, Commentary Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The Tea Party Review Magazine, Big Government, Big Journalism, The Gateway Pundit, Instapundit, and many more.

 

Feel free to contact Henry D'Andrea at writedandrea@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter: @TheHenry 

 

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