Elder care: Remembering the memories you’re making

Despite all our advances, age still brings challenges.

WASHINGTON, DC, September 26, 2012 - In different societies, elders have been treated with different amounts of respect. In Native American cultures, elders are seen as wise. In ancient Rome, they were carted off with the sick and left to die. In modern America, with all our medical advances and quality of living, people are living longer. They are also functional and capable of independence longer. This has led to aging individuals participating in activities that would have seemed beyond them 50 years ago. People of any age can go on adventure treks, skydiving, or any number of memorable activities.

Despite all our advances, age still brings challenges. Sometimes they are physical, sometimes they are mental. There are ways to attempt to prevent these challenges, but none of them are full-proof. Here are some suggestions for keeping your mind as sharp as possible and ways to pass on your legacy when the memories start to fade.

Mental Exercises

The best way to keep your mind fit is to exercise it. This can be done in many ways. You can find crosswords, Sudoku and other brain puzzles for free online. There are even websites dedicated specifically to brain strengthening games.

As far as memory goes, pop culture trivia can be a great way to learn and be able to recall a large number of facts, names, and events. By playing games like this, you get your mind in the habit of remembering information.

Photo Albums

No matter what we do though, some things are going to slide from our immediate memory. Sometimes we need prompts in order to remember certain people and events. Sometimes we don’t really forget, but photos can bring memories or aspects of occasions back to the forefront of our minds.

There are a lot of ways to keep photos. You can keep them in a box, in a photo album, or if you want to be a bit more creative, a scrapbook. The great thing about digital cameras is that you can now make online scrapbooks for a low cost, and include captions and information, making it easy to make the recordings of your memories in an attractive fashion.

Journals

When we write down information, it is recorded in our minds differently than when we speak or go over it in our heads. Keeping a journal, whether a physical one or a digital version, is a great way to have records of happenings in your life. You can easily double check facts, or re-read entries so you can reminisce.

Photos and Journals have the bonus of being a history of your life for other people to look back and remember your life. By clearly documenting entries, you make sure people know about your life. Leaving journals to kids and grandchildren is very common, and if your mind does begin to slip as you age, it is something you can go through together in order to help you recall events and for them to learn more about you.

If you record journal entries online, be sure to write down the log in information for loved ones to find. This goes for online photo journals and scrapbooks as well. The only concern is that you make sure you only write things you would like other people to know. If you want your thoughts to remain private forever, then keeping a different journal or document is a good idea.

Photos and journals can help keep memories alive whether you have memory problems or not. They also are a fun way to document your life, and can become quite the hobby if you want it to. Keeping your mind and memory strong while you are alive will only strengthen your legacy after you are gone. These suggestions will help you remain close to your loved ones hearts for years after the events you record.

 

Sarah Jennings has been taking care of others her whole life. In 2005, she moved her mother into her family home. She uses her personal experience to share with others about caring for the elderly. She currently writes for Brookdale assisted living.

 


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Sarah Jennings

 Sarah Jennings has been taking care of others her whole life. In 2005, she moved her mother into her family home in Brentwood, Tennessee. She uses her personal experience to share with others about caring for the elderly. She currently writes for Brookdale assisted living.

 

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