Argentine men protect church from feminist attackers

During a women's rights protest, 7,00 women tried to storm a local church while men surrounded the cathedral in an attempt to protect it. Photo: Cathedral at San Juan de Cuyo, Argentina/Wikimedia

DALLAS, December 5, 2013 — Last week, participants in the 28th annual National Meeting of Women in Argentina attempted to storm a local church and assaulted its defenders, a practice that has become customary at the feminist conference. This year, their attacks also included physical assaults on the men surrounding the Cathedral of San Juan de Cuyo in an attempt protect it from damage.

The National Meeting of Women is an annual feminist meeting in Argentina where the participants discuss women’s rights, trafficking, gender issues and abortion, according to Infobae, an Argentinian news source.

Seventeen thousand women marched through the streets to close the conference, an event that has led to attacks on the local cathedrals in the host cities going back to at least 2008.

This year, 1,500 men surrounded the cathedral to defend it from 7,000 women from the feminist conference, Infobae reported. The protesters, many of whom were topless, sprayed paint on the men, wrote on their faces with markers, and spat on them, in addition to other indignities. The men stood with linked arms and prayed during the assault. Inside the church the Archbishop Alfonso Delgado also led 700 people in prayer.

The National Meeting of Women is an annual feminist meeting in Argentina where the participants discuss women’s rights, trafficking, gender issues and abortion, according to Infobae, an Argentinian news source. Seventeen thousand women marched through the streets to close the conference, an event that has led to attacks on the local cathedrals in the host cities going back to at least 2008.

In addition to the assault on the cathedral, the protesters sprayed pro-abortion and pro-gay graffiti around the city and burned an effigy of Pope Francis, who is from Argentina. Women danced and ran around the burning figure shouting, ‘If the Pope were a woman, abortion would be legal” and “Get your rosaries off our ovaries.”

Protests outside the Cathedral at San Juan de Cuyo, Argentina/Photo: Argentinos Alerta

 

While media reports describe the event as “clashes” between the groups, the video shows the men engaged in non-violent resistance, standing arm in arm and not reacting to the attacks from the women, even while they are being physically assaulted.  Likewise, no video of counter-protesters has emerged during the other demonstrations.

InfoCatólica reported that the 600 police on hand told them they could do nothing to stop the protesters because, “they are women.” They also report Father Rómulo Cámpora, pastor of the cathedral, was assaulted, along with two other religious leaders.

Father Cámpora told the local paper Diario de Cuyo, “If they don’t respect life, we can’t expect them to respect the buildings.” Last year, Archbishop Juan Martinez of Posadas left the graffiti on the church buildings there for 48 hours to publicize the behavior of the mob, according to the Catholic News Agency.

CNA has reported similar attacks going back 2008, however this year’s assault was much larger. Only 500 protesters attacked the cathedral in Posadas and its defenders in 2012, compared to the 7,000 reported at the cathedral in San Juan this year.  


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April Thompson

April Thompson is a writer and home educator. She has a background in pro-life political work, including speaking to national, state and local groups on life issues. April lives near Dallas, Texas with her husband and four children.

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