Gifts for the pedaler and cyclists in your life

Our favorite cycling gifts of the season Photo: Bicycle taxidermy by Regan Appleton

Sometimes the simplest things are the most helpful and useful. Last year’s list was of things we wanted, this year, it’s all about what we use, love and plan to give to cycling friends as gifts.

Packable Rolling Fender $25.00 @ MissionBicycle.com

Bike commuters and recreational riders alike know what it’s like to ride on wet roads. Fenders make a huge difference when riding on rainy or snowy days. However, not everyone wants a clunky fender on their bike all the time.

Packable rolling fender by Mission Bicycle

From Mission Bicycle Company comes one of our favorite products, the packable rolling fender. This lightweight, temporary fender installs in seconds with no tools or hardware, protecting you and you bicycle from water, grit and sand. When you are not using it, it rolls up and wraps around your frame, your bag, or even your wrist or ankle.

Packable rolling fender by Mission Bicycle

Available in 10 different colors at $25.00, this is an accessory every cyclist will love.

The Moxie Cycling Jersey $ 65.00 @ Moxiecycling.com

Cycling jerseys for women don’t come in a huge variety of styles and do not tend to be very flattering—unless you are buying a Moxie jersey. Flattering on the top, forgiving in the middle, and in great styles and colors, Moxie jerseys are great for everyday riding, but cute enough for a cycling date or lunch with friends. 

Moxie cycling jersey

More important, this jersey is tagless and has ergonomic seams, so there is no chafing, scratching or skin irritation, even after hours of riding. The neck and back are comfortable and don’t creep up while riding or exercising. Moxie’s innovative fabric draws the sweat away from your body and dries very quickly. 

This is a great jersey for short and long rides, running errands, or going to the gym.

Bicycle taxidermy, price varies @ Bicycletaxidermy.com

Avid cyclists tend to form strong attachments to particular bikes: a first road bike, the bike they wrecked on, went cross-country with, etc. This leads to bicycle hoarding, with bikes that haven’t been ridden in years dying a slow lonely death in the corner of the garage or basement.

Enter Regan Appleton and brainchild bicycle taxidermy, a clever way to repurpose bike handlebars and give them the place of honor they deserve. Appleton’s London-based service helps you mount your “beast” on a locally made oak plate above a stainless steel etched plaque denoting model, pet name, dates ridden, and a commemorative verse.

Bicycle taxidermy by Regan Appleton

A word of warning, however: before you go hunting for your husband or wife’s treasured bike in the pit of the basement, ask. Cyclists can be touchy about what you do to their bikes, and taxidermy, while awesome, is pretty drastic.

BicycleTaxidermy.com also offers newly sourced handlebars—in case you can’t bring yourself to sacrifice your own—that are ready to mount on a wall for a great statement.

Stocking Stuffers

For a last minute gift or stocking stuffer, there are a variety of stylish, colorful lights that are temporary, can be attached in seconds and require no tools or hardware, and can be as little as $5.

Commuters and urban cyclists also love leg straps, which keep pants from getting snagged in the chain, and they can be found in a variety of colors and styles.

The Click Multi Tool, from Mission Bicycle is also a great stocking stuffer for $8, with seven different tools to get you out of most jams.


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Laura Sesana

Laura Sesana is a writer and DC, Maryland attorney, joining the Communities in 2012.  She is the author of Colombia: Natural Parks, and has also written several articles on literary criticism.  She writes about food, health, nutrition, women’s legal issues, and the environment.  

In addition to writing for the Communities, Laura also works as an attorney and legal content writer.

 

Contact Laura Sesana

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